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Celebrity Deaths

ole timer

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#21
1990
Greta Garbo dies
On this day in 1990, the beautiful, enigmatic Swedish film star Greta Garbo dies at the age of 84, in New York City.

Born Greta Gustaffson, Garbo grew up in poverty in Stockholm, working in a barber shop and later in a department store to help support her family after her father died. From 1922 to 1924, Garbo studied on scholarship at the Stockholm Royal Dramatic Theater’s acting school. She was discovered by the director Mauritz Stiller, who cast her in his epic film The Legend of Gosta Berling and gave her the stage name Garbo. When Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer offered Stiller a film contract, he took Garbo with him to Hollywood. She made her American film debut in 1926’s The Torrent, and quickly became a sensation.

By the end of the 1920s, Garbo was playing the leading lady–on- and off-screen–opposite John Gilbert, the preeminent silent film actor of the day, in Flesh and the Devil and Love, among other films. Garbo made her sound debut in 1930’s Anna Christie; the film’s tagline was “Garbo Talks!” Her husky voice and thick accent only increased her exotic, mysterious appeal, and Garbo would reign supreme among Hollywood’s A-list actresses throughout the 1930s. She stood out in a star-studded cast in Grand Hotel (1932), the film in which she famously declared “I want to be alone,” as well as in a reunion with Gilbert (whose career in the era of sound did not fare so well) in Queen Christina (1933). Two later performances, in Anna Karenina (1935) and Camille (1936), both won her Best Actress honors from the New York Film Critics.

Garbo’s first comedy–marketed as “Garbo Laughs!”–was the acclaimed Ninotchka (1939), directed by Ernst Lubitsch. The coming of World War II cut off the European market, where Garbo’s films had always been more popular than in the United States, and when MGM refused to meet her salary demands, Garbo announced her retirement. Though she intended to return to work in Hollywood after the war ended, the planned projects never came to fruition. Despite three nominations, Garbo never won an Academy Award for Best Actress. She was given an honorary Oscar in 1955, however, for what the Academy called “a series of luminous and unforgettable performances.”

Known as the “Swedish Sphinx” for her unreadable image onscreen and her legendary aloofness, Garbo did no interviews after the early years of her career and declined to participate in the autograph-signing, public appearances and other trappings of the movie star life. She was never known to have married, but her love affairs–with Gilbert and others–inspired endless speculation. Having become an American citizen in 1951, she spent much of her post-Hollywood life living in New York, though she traveled frequently to Europe.
 

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#22
1986
Otto Preminger dies
On this day in 1986, the director, producer and character actor Otto Preminger dies at the age of 80. Preminger, a Jew who fled Austria before World War II, more than once played Nazis on stage and screen. As a director, he earned a reputation as an exacting and often tyrannical force on the set, as well as a rebel who challenged film censorship.

Born in Vienna, Preminger began producing plays during law school, which he finished before he was 20. Law degree in hand, he decided instead to pursue theater, and within a decade he was managing his own theater and had directed his first film, Die Grosse Liebe (The Great Love). With the rise of Nazism in Germany and the increasingly uncomfortable climate for Jews in his own country, Preminger left Austria for the United States in 1935. That year, he directed the play Libel on Broadway. He then moved to Hollywood to begin working in films. Due to a falling out with the 20th Century Fox mogul Darryl Zanuck, Preminger was fired as the director of Kidnapped (1938) just a few weeks into filming.

Preminger returned to Broadway as an actor and director. In the early 1940s, he cast himself as a Nazi in the hit play Margin for Error. Asked to play the role in the 1943 film version, produced by 20th Century Fox, he agreed–on the condition he could direct as well. Zanuck was off with the army making documentary films, and no one at Fox objected. Preminger was still around later in the year, directing the noir mystery Laura (1944), when Zanuck returned. He reportedly allowed Preminger to stay on as director only because an early look at the film led him to believe it would fail. Instead, it became a box-office smash and earned Preminger the best reviews of his career.

In the 1950s, Preminger promoted the use of wide-screen technology with films like Carmen Jones (1954). Throughout his career, he challenged the repressive Hays Code, which placed strict limitations on the language and content of Hollywood movies. In 1953, Preminger directed the comedy The Moon Is Blue, adapted from a stage play he had also directed. After he refused to cut the forbidden words “virgin” and “pregnant,” the film was denied the Production Code Seal of Approval and condemned by the Catholic Church and conservative groups. Preminger sued some local censorship boards, and the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the boards could not stop the showing of the film. The Moon Is Blue became a box-office hit. Preminger broke barriers again in 1955, when he dared to treat the taboo subject of heroin addiction in The Man with the Golden Arm, starring Frank Sinatra. His 1959 hit, Anatomy of a Murder, featured a frank discussion of rape. Taken together, Preminger’s films undoubtedly contributed to speeding up the process of revising the restrictive Production Code standards.

Preminger was known to terrorize his actors–his nickname was “Otto the Terrible”–and a few Hollywood stars reportedly refused to work with or even speak to him. His private life was also tempestuous: He was married three times, and after the famous stripper Gypsy Rose Lee died in 1971, Preminger revealed he was the father of her 26-year-old son, Erik Kirkland, who was then working as the filmmaker’s casting director and assistant. Preminger adopted Kirkland, who subsequently changed his name to Erik Lee Preminger.
 

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#23
1995
Ginger Rogers dies
On this day in 1995, the actress Ginger Rogers, best known for the 10 films she made with her dance partner Fred Astaire, dies at the age of 83.

Born in Missouri, Rogers began taking dance and singing lessons as a toddler. By age five, she was appearing in commercials. At age 15, she won a Charleston dancing contest and soon after began touring the Southern and Midwestern vaudeville circuit with her act, “Ginger and the Redheads.” Her mother, Lela, a reporter and writer, worked as Ginger’s manager and traveled with her as a chaperone. She and Ginger’s father had divorced shortly after Ginger was born, and Lela would continue to manage her daughter’s career until her death in 1971.

After making a splash on Broadway in George Gershwin’s hit play Girl Crazy, Rogers signed a film contract in 1931. She would play a series of wisecracking blondes in a number of B movies, working at various studios before settling at RKO. In 1933, she was paired with Fred Astaire in Flying Down to Rio. Although she lacked formal ballroom training, she and Astaire made a perfect match on the dance floor. Audiences flocked to the 10 movies they made together, including The Gay Divorcee (1933), Top Hat (1935), Swing Time (1936) and Shall We Dance? (1937). Apart from her graceful dance moves, Rogers also established her credentials as a serious actress with her performance in the 1940 film Kitty Foyle, for which she won an Academy Award for Best Actress.

According to an obituary published in the New York Times, Rogers was the highest-paid women in America by 1941, earning $355,000 per year. In addition to a hilltop mansion in Beverly Hills, she also bought a ranch on Oregon’s Rogue River, where she spent as much of her free time as possible. Married and divorced five times, Rogers had no children. She continued to perform into the mid-1960s, scoring triumphs on Broadway in Hello, Dolly in 1965 and in London with Mame in 1969. Rogers made her final film appearance in 1965, when she played the mother of the actress Jean Harlow in the biopic Harlow
 

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#24
1977
Joan Crawford dies
On this day in 1977, the legendary actress Joan Crawford dies of a heart attack in her New York City apartment.

Born Lucille Fay Le Sueur (her birth year has been variously recorded as 1904 or 1908), Crawford was a nightclub dancer who broke into Broadway musicals in the Jazz Age of the 1920s. She first twisted her way into Hollywood stardom as a vivacious flapper in the 1928 silent film Our Dancing Daughters. She made a series of similar pictures, including Dancing Lady (1933), which co-starred Fred Astaire in his silver-screen debut. Crawford’s seamless transition into the sound film era made her one of the most popular and–by the late 1930s–one of the highest-paid leading ladies in Hollywood. She fought for more varied and less stereotypical parts, winning dramatic roles in films such as The Women (1939), Susan and God (1940), Strange Cargo (1940) and A Woman’s Face (1941).

In 1945, just when her career appeared to be on the wane, Crawford turned in the performance for which she would most be remembered, playing the title role in Mildred Pierce. As the waitress and single mother who makes her fortune with a chain of restaurants, Crawford won an Academy Award for Best Actress and established herself as a respected dramatic actress. She would be nominated for another Best Actress Oscar for 1947’s Possessed and a third for 1952’s Sudden Fear.

By the late 1950s, Crawford had become a representative for the Pepsi-Cola Company, whose board chairman and chief executive, Alfred N. Steele, she married in 1955. Three previous marriages–to the actors Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Franchot Tone and Phillip Terry–had ended in divorce. When Steele died in 1959, Crawford was named the first female director of Pepsi-Cola’s board. In 1962, the tenacious actress made a celebrated foray into the horror genre with What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, co-starring Bette Davis. Having always enthusiastically welcomed and cultivated her fame, Crawford published her autobiography, A Portrait of Joan, that same year. She went on to make a number of thrillers in the last years of her career, as well as occasional appearances in television dramas.

Less than two years after Crawford’s death in 1977, her adopted daughter Christina published Mommie Dearest, in which she alleged that the famous actress had been emotionally and physically abusive to Christina and her adopted brother. The book was later made into a critically panned film, starring Faye Dunaway as Crawford.
 

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#25
Beth Champan (1967–2019)



Duane “Dog the Bounty Hunter” Chapman’s wife, Beth Chapman, died on Wednesday morning after suffering from throat and lung cancer. She was 51.

Chapman confirmed the news of his wife’s death in a tweet, writing “It’s 5:32 in Hawaii, this is the time she would wake up to go hike Koko Head mountain. Only today, she hiked the stairway to heaven. We all love you, Beth. See you on the other side.”

It’s 5:32 in Hawaii, this is the time she would wake up to go hike Koko Head mountain. Only today, she hiked the stairway to heaven. We all love you, Beth. See you on the other side.

— Duane Dog Chapman (@DogBountyHunter) June 26, 2019

On June 22, Chapman’s family released a statement to Hawaii News Now saying that she had been admitted to the ICU at the Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu, where she was placed in a medically-induced coma.

 

wildhoney66

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i never could stand that show as i can't stand reality tv but that doesn't mean i wished her ill either i didn't it sucks she had to go through that but at least he's not in anymore pain if she was in any at all
 

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#27
Peter Fonda (1940–2019)

IMDB

Code:
https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001228
Peter Henry Fonda was born in New York City, to legendary screen star Henry Fonda and New York socialite Frances Seymour Brokaw. He is the brother of actress Jane Fonda and the father of actress Bridget Fonda. His ancestry includes Dutch, English, Scottish, and distant French and Italian. Fonda made his professional stage debut on Broadway in 1961 Read More at
Code:
https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001228/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm
 

wildhoney66

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now Peter Fonda however is a favorite actor of mine and it's a shame he's gone now but he had a good life at 79 i'd like to think
 
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