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Robin Hood

ole timer

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The subject of ballads, books and films, Robin Hood has proven to be one of popular culture’s most enduring folk heroes. Over the course of 700 years, the outlaw from Nottinghamshire who robs from the rich to give to the poor has emerged as one of the most enduring folk heroes in popular culture–and one of the most versatile. But how has the legend of Sherwood Forest’s merry outlaws evolved over time, and did a real Robin Hood inspire these classic tales?

Beginning in the 15th century and perhaps even earlier, Christian revelers in certain parts of England celebrated May Day with plays and games involving a Robin Hood figure with near-religious significance. In the 19th century, writer-illustrators like Howard Pyle adapted the traditional tales for children, popularizing them in the United States and around the world. More recently, bringing Robin to the silver screen has become a rite of passage for directors ranging from Michael Curtiz and Ridley Scott to Terry Gilliam and Mel Brooks.

Throughout Robin’s existence, writers, performers and filmmakers have probed their imaginations for new incarnations that resonate with their respective audiences. In 14th-century England, where agrarian discontent had begun to chip away at the feudal system, he appears as an anti-establishment rebel who murders government agents and wealthy landowners. Later variations from times of less social upheaval dispense with the gore and cast Robin as a dispossessed aristocrat with a heart of gold and a love interest, Maid Marian.

Academics, meanwhile, have combed the historical record for evidence of a real Robin Hood. English legal records suggest that, as early as the 13th century, “Robehod,” “Rabunhod” and other variations had become common epithets for criminals. But what had inspired these nicknames: a fictional tale, an infamous bandit or an amalgam of both? The first literary references to Robin Hood appear in a series of 14th- and 15th-century ballads about a violent yeoman who lived in Sherwood Forest with his men and frequently clashed with the Sheriff of Nottingham. Rather than a peasant, knight or fallen noble, as in later versions, the protagonist of these medieval stories is a commoner. Little John and Will Scarlet are part of this Robin’s “merry” crew—meaning, at the time, an outlaw’s gang—but Maid Marian, Friar Tuck and Alan-a-Dale would not enter the legend until later, possibly as part of the May Day rituals.

While most contemporary scholars have failed to turn up solid clues, medieval chroniclers took for granted that a historical Robin Hood lived and breathed during the 12th or 13th century. The details of their accounts vary widely, however, placing him in conflicting regions and eras. Not until John Major’s “History of Greater Britain” (1521), for example, is he depicted as a follower of King Richard, one of his defining characteristics in modern times.

We may never know for sure whether Robin Hood ever existed outside the verses of ballads and pages of books. And even if we did, fans young and old would still surely flock to England’s Nottinghamshire region for a tour of the legend’s alleged former hangouts, from centuries-old pubs to the Major Oak in Sherwood Forest. What we do know is that the notion of a brave rebel who lives on the outskirts of society, fighting injustice and oppression with his band of companions, has universal appeal—whether he’s played by Erroll Flynn, Russell Crowe or even, as on a 1979 episode of “The Muppet Show,” Kermit the Frog
 

podge

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Although Robin Hood has been attributed to the Nottingham Area , He is also known in North Yorkshire probably about the 11th - 12th century its probable he was no more than a yeoman farmer in the long struggle with the invading Norman conquerers.
between Whitby and Scarborough their is a place called Robin Hoods Bay and Sherrif Hutton near to York itself are in some of the old tales
He was Probably an adherent of Tostig Godwinson Earl of Northumberland younger brother to Harald Godwinson King of England ,We all know Tostig allied himself to Harald Hardrada the Norse King which Harald Godwinson had to force march an Army from Winchester to York in 1066 to a Battle at Stamford Bridge near York where he defeated Harald Hardrada's forces scattering those Forces , Harald Godwinson then got word that Duke William the Bastard had landed forces in Hastings this warranted another forced march back South we all know the rest
Its possible that Duke William of Normandy was in Collusion with King Harald Hardrada as Normandy had only come about when the King of France ceded Lands in France to King Rollo (Viking) just six generations beforehand and the Land in France that was ceded Happened to be Normandy
King William had Subdued the South of England except from around Ely (Hereward the Wake) and needed to Subdue the North he did this in 1069

after the Harrying of the North By King William in 1069–70 , Its possible that Robin Hood came about as a local Hero but had to retreat South of York when King William ordered the Harrying of the North at that time the Great Forest was between York and Nottingham So he may have ranged the whole area
 
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